3D/VR Creation and Curation in Higher Education:

A Colloquium to Explore Standards and Best Practices

Location

University Libraries University of Oklahoma 401 W Brooks Street Norman, OK 73019

Dates

March 8-9, 2018

Purpose

To bring together experts in 3D/VR creation, visualization, analysis, curation, and preservation to form common guidelines that will aid librarians and digital curators tasked with managing these new data types.

About the Colloquium

The changing role of academic libraries in scholarly production alongside the rich history of metadata and preservation within the library setting reinforces the need for the library to be a hub where otherwise siloed bases of knowledge for working with 3D/VR can connect. This colloquium draws together experts and academic practitioners in the areas of 3D/VR creation, visualization, analysis, curation, and preservation to form common guidelines that will aid librarians and digital curators tasked with managing these new data types. Speakers will address issues including metadata creation for 3D/VR description, provenance, and preservation, as well as data curation workflows and strategies to further collaboration between researchers and library staff in higher education.  The presentations and moderated discussions will also enable knowledge exchange between experts from often siloed areas of 3D/VR (e.g., bridging the gap between experts in 3D scanning and experts in metadata creation for preservation purposes).

 

The colloquium format will consist of lightning talks, expert lectures/workshops, and moderated discussions. Day one of the colloquium will begin with lightning talks by all participants in attendance so that there is a clear idea of the expertise in the room and to begin to identify the range of challenges that participants are encountering when working with 3D/VR. Throughout both days, eight invited experts will lead presentations. The small, expert-led panels will enable participants to share their expertise in 3D content creation, VR visualization and analysis, 3D/VR-based educational deployment, and 3D/VR data curation with practitioners in other areas, thus developing holistic knowledge about these complex and multifaceted technologies for a diverse community of practitioners. Moderated discussions between experts and participants will enable the identification of challenges faced in implementing these technologies in research and teaching, and will identify the areas in which academic libraries can and should play a role as well as what best practices and standards could help them fulfill this role.

Schedule

Thursday 3/8
8.15 & 8.45 Hotel Pickup
8.30-9.15 Continental Breakfast
9.15-9.30 Welcome from OU Libraries
Associate Dean, Carl Grant & Colloquium Planning Committee
9.30-10.30 Tornado Talks
10.30-11 Discussion
11-11.45 Collaborative Approaches to Modeling the Past in 3D and AR/VR: The Interdisciplinary Humanities Lab for Teaching, Research, and Public Outreach
Victoria Szabo
11.45-1.15 Lunch / Tour of OU Libraries, VR & Beyond
1.15-2 Building for Tomorrow: Creating and Saving Digital Design Assets
Ann Whiteside
2-2.45 Virtual Bethel | Preserving and Sharing an Indianapolis Legacy
Zeb Wood
2.34-3 Coffee Break
3.00-3.45 Cultural Heritage Informatics at the University of Virginia Library
Will Rourk
3.45-4.30 Preparing photogrammetry models of live animals for animation.
Jeremy A. Bot
4.30-5 Discussion
Friday 3/9
8.15 & 8.45 Hotel Pickup
8.30-9.30 Coffee and Pastries
9.30-10.15 Sharing Collections Online in 3D
Thomas Flynn
10.15-10.30 Break
10.30-11.15 Community Infrastructure: An Action Agenda for Software Preservation
Jessica Meyerson
11.15-12 Discoveries from the CS3DP Forum 1: Setting the stage for our community to develop standards for 3D data preservation
Jennifer Moore
12-1 Lunch
1-2 Synthesis Discussion
2 Colloquium Concludes and Attendees Head Home

Abstracts

Collaborative Approaches to Modeling the Past in 3D and AR/VR: The Interdisciplinary Humanities Lab for Teaching, Research, and Public Outreach

Victoria Szabo

This session explores the humanities lab model for teaching collaborative, project-based courses that use 3D and VR/AR for historical and cultural heritage research and presentation. At its best, such teaching promotes engagement and deeper learning on the part of students, exposes new research questions for the researchers and subject-area specialists involved, and results in digital projects that provide a deeper understanding of historic sites, objects, and phenomena to the wider public. The dangers of focusing on 3D and VR/AR production in class, however, may include, on the hand, eclipse of historical and cultural course themes in favor of technology development, and on the other hand, unrealistic expectations for the quality, accuracy, and completeness of the digital products creating within the context of any one course. Drawing upon examples from Duke University, we will consider how the interdisciplinary lab approach can mitigate these concerns through the use of umbrella projects and coordinated course offerings, shared collections of resources and training materials, and the development of intentional project management strategies in coordination with library, IT, and external partners.

Building for Tomorrow: Creating and Saving Digital Design Assets

Ann Whiteside

Building for Tomorrow, a grant sponsored by the IMLS under the National Digital Platform will provide a venue for a diverse group of stakeholders to think collaboratively about issues in preserving architectural design data, to find alignments across communities, and to identify the needs required to develop an infrastructure to support archiving of digital design information that will be usable by a variety of types and sizes of architectural museums and archives.

Virtual Bethel | Preserving and Sharing an Indianapolis Legacy

Zeb Wood

Virtual Bethel is a preservation initiative of Bethel AMC church, Indianapolis’ oldest African American church, recently sold to a hotel. A team of Media Arts and Library Information Sciences faculty and students at IUPUI scanned, recreated, preserved the space within Virtual Reality and are currently in partnership with local heritage institutions to embed Bethel’s archive into interactive story ‘vignettes’ within Virtual Bethel to educate the user and enrich the space beyond VR navigation. A journey towards creating curated interactions within virtually preserved spaces and creating multiple points of access to the public will be reviewed.

Preparing photogrammetry models of live animals for animation.

Jeremy A. Bot

Using multiple cameras and photogrammetry software, the Digital Life Project is able to capture living animals with an accuracy of greater than one millimeter. Even after digitizing the animal there are still many challenges, as the processed geometry and textures require complete reconstruction to ready them for animation. This presentation will describe our process for using open source software to perform these tasks, with special care taken to maintain the structure and high frequency details of the subject.

Cultural Heritage Informatics at the University of Virginia Library

Will Rourk

The University of Virginia Library is located at a UNESCO World Heritage site surrounded by a spectrum history at every scale from artifact to architecture. The Cultural Heritage Informatics team at the UVA Library collects, processes, archives and disseminates data from this spectrum of material culture obtained through the use of 3D documentation technologies including laser scanning, structured light scanning, terrestrial and aerial photogrammetry and precision 3D modeling. 3D assets are made available to the scholarly public using Open Data platforms such as Dataverse for wide use across disciplines in a variety of output modes such as 3D printing, GIS, CAD/BIM and virtual, augmented and mixed reality systems. The UVA Library has an active interest in establishing a collaborative environment focused on cultural heritage data methods and workflows with the scholarly community.

Sharing Collections Online in 3D

Thomas Flynn

Three-dimensional documentation of historical artefacts and locations has long been part of the work undertaken by museums, libraries and similar organisations but it is only in the last five or so years that capture and display methods have become widespread. This session will examine what happens when hundreds of institutions from all over the world publish their 3D data online and in one place, considering the often varied intentions and outcomes along the way. 3D capture is now affordable, easy to use and getting more accurate every year; modern smartphone and desktop devices combined with the latest web APIs for 3D, virtual and augmented reality can display huge amounts of complex data in new ways. More and more 3D content is being produced all the time and now more people than ever can view it in full 3D.

Community Infrastructure: An Action Agenda for Software Preservation

Jennifer Meyerson

Building on a thirty-year history of applied research undertaken in the library, archives, and computer science realms, current efforts are advancing practice to build community infrastructure that supports software preservation and reuse. This talk will describe the contemporary landscape, including mobilization of a cross-sector coalition of stakeholders that share a common software preservation action agenda. Colloquium participants will be asked to discuss the action agenda and to consider ways to measure progress towards shared goals.

Discoveries from the CS3DP Forum 1: Setting the stage for our community to develop standards for 3D data preservation.

Jennifer Moore

In February of 2018, the Community Standards for 3D Data Preservation project will have held its first national forum. The focus of this event is to unpack and expand upon five major areas of concern identified from a community survey focused on 3D preservation: best practices for preservation; data management; metadata (heavy emphasis); discoverability/access and copyright/ownership. This presentation will describe the project, discoveries from forum one and the plan for moving the CS3DP forward.

Institutional Partners

Support for this colloquium has been provided by:

css.php